Michael J. Beran, Ph.D.
Curriculum Vitae

Home
Research
Collaborators
News
Books
Journal Articles
Presentations
Funding
Teaching
Sites of Interest

Contact Me:  [email protected]
 

Last updated: 
September 1, 2021

 

 

Evans, T. A., & Beran, M. J. (2007). Chimpanzees use self-distraction to cope with impulsivity. Biology Letters, 3, 599-602. 

It is unknown whether animals, like humans, can employ behavioral strategies to cope with impulsivity. To examine this question, we tested whether chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) would use self-distraction as a coping strategy in a situation in which they had to continually inhibit responses to accumulating candies in order to earn a greater amount of those rewards. We tested animals in three conditions in which they were sometimes given a set of toys and were sometimes allowed physical access to the accumulating candies. Chimpanzees allowed the rewards to accumulate longer before responding when they could divert their attention to the toys, and they manipulated the toys more when the candies were physically accessible. Thus, chimpanzees engaged in self-distraction with the toys when such behavior was most beneficial as a coping mechanism.

Return to Top